Career graveyard: Can't blame Grabban for asking to leave Sunderland; few exit with stock bolstered

He came, he scored a few goals and five months later he asked to leave. Lewis Grabb

by Brandon_Rawlin Sunday, 07 January 2018 10:15 AM Comments
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He came, he scored a few goals and five months later he asked to leave. Lewis Grabban looks set to be sold by Bournemouth after asking to exit Sunderland late last week. Can't blame him - not many escape Wearside with their reputations bolstered. 

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So Sky Sports have claimed this morning that Lewis Grabban will certainly leave Bournemouth to sign a permanent deal somewhere after the 29-year-old striker asked to cut short his loan to Sunderland. 

The striker, who bagged 12 goals during his part-season stint at the Stadium of Light, is one of the few to escape with their reputation restored and their stock bolstered by being associated with the basket-case on the banks of the Wear. 

Just ask Simon Grayson or David Moyes; Fabio Borini or Wahbi Khazri; Lamine Kone or Steven Fletcher; Jack Rodwell or Danny Graham (lol). The list of players and managers who signed for Sunderland and made a success of their spell on Wearside is small. Jermain Defoe and Sam Allardyce probably top the chart from recent years of those who bucked the trend and escaped with their stock higher on departure than it was when they arrived. 

So in the grand scheme, few with a cool head can really begrudge Lewis Grabban for putting his own career progression ahead of Sunderland's growing relegation crisis. He will sign a permanent deal for a top-half Championship side before the window closes no doubt and his goalscoring this season enables him to negotiate a decent deal for himself. 

Indeed, there is also a suggestion that the much-travelled forward had mooted the prospect of signing a permanent deal at the Stadium of Light but was told he had no chance with the club's finances ruling out paying a fee either in January or next summer. The reality of the dreadful situation at Sunderland is not Grabban's problem, nor is it Bournemouth's.

The Black Cats should probably just be grateful they got a few goals out of a deal which landed them a striker whose pay was largely paid by his parent club. Reports have suggested Sunderland only paid a third of Grabban's wages but the real challenge now is to replace him for a striker who can compensate for his loss. 

Sunderland have only scored once in the four games since Grabban was ruled out through injury. Indeed, Chris Coleman's side have only managed three goals in their last seven which highlights how desperate we are to land a hit man who can score as quickly as possible now. Some have suggested the Bournemouth man's workrate wasn't up to scratch but his return of twelve goals in 19 games for a side at the bottom of the league does not lie. 

James Vaughan has proven to be a terrible signing - another who will leave scarred by his time at Sunderland - and Josh Maja requires nurturing rather than having the goalscoring burden lumped onto his young shoulders. Replacing Grabban is the true issue here, not the nature of his exit. 

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